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Second Nature (2016)

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Second Nature

SumSecond Naturemary

A woman and man compete in an unusual race for mayor when gender roles magically reverse.

Genre : Comedy
Country : USA

Cast :
Collette Wolfe : Amanda
Sam Huntington : Bret
Riley Shanahan : Dex

Director :
Michael Cross

My opinion on “Second Nature”

“Behind every great woman, there is a man …
staring at her ass.”

Remember Mel Gibson in “What women want” where you could see him experimenting with cosmetics and nylons just so he could relate to the female emotional landscape? I admit it. I always watch this movie when I come across it on a tv-channel. I guess it’s one of my guilty pleasure. It’s not entirely identical to the concept of “Second nature“, but the film also tries to show how different women and men think about certain things. Mel Gibson had the privilege in this movie to capture the thoughts of women surrounding him and use it to his advantage. Well, maybe it was the concept that attracted me and the usefulness I saw in it as a man. Or perhaps it was due to the presence of the attractive actress Helen Hunt. In “Second nature“, it’s a complete community where the personalities of women and men are being exchanged. Except the main players. They are being spared and retain their typical characteristics. What makes for hilarious conditions again. At least that should be the intention. However, there’s not much hilarity to be seen in this “Switch“-like pseudo comedy.

Second Nature

Really? A time capsule?.

Amanda (Collette Wolfe) tells her grandmother Estelle (Carolyn Cox) about the sexist behavior of her boss Bret (Sam Huntington) and the way she’s being judged by the male community. Estelle knows a redeeming idea. Before you know it, the two are digging for a time capsule in a meadow (Who came with that idea?). To Amanda’s astonishment the capsule contains, besides a giant dildo (uncontrolable laughter), a magic mirror that apparently could change her life. Don’t expect a detailed explanation about this. No clue how Amanda’s in-earlier-days-sexually-highly-active grandmother got it and what happened to her. Better this way. Otherwise the movie would take even longer.

Second Nature

Women behave like men. Men behave like women.

When the ruling mayor subsequently drives of a rock (fellatio-wise), Bret and Amanda are candidates for the vacant position. Bret has the most chance of getting this privileged position as he, as future mayor, will make sure that Louisburg will have plenty of strip bars and bars where lascivious, big-breasted servants serve the always horny male population. While Amanda is being laughed at because of her safety-suggestions and other less impressive slogans. Until the darned mirror shows its force at a political meeting (apparently Amanda carries this antique trinket with her everywhere) and suddenly the chances of Amanda look quite promising. The magic mirror causes women to behave like men. While men suddenly inherit the characteristics of the women.

Second Nature

Caution : Woman-Hole!

What follows is a string of faint allusions to the exchange of male and female characteristics. Men are insecure, sensitive people who aren’t afraid of using make-up now and then and who are being harassed by men-hungry women. And those women are suddenly individuals who are taking a leak while standing upright, make lewd, sexist remarks and as street workers make a pass at guys who walk by (while standing next to a warning sign that says “Caution: woman-hole!”. How subtle). The used humor isn’t really rude, but after a while you know which message they are trying to convey.

Second Nature

I feel sorry for the opposite sex.

Indeed, it’s true that women are treated unfriendly by society. Their opinion isn’t asked for sometimes. Or even heard to. And sometimes they are simply ignored. On the other hand, I feel a little bit insulted because it’s as if all men are sexist, butt slapping, unhygienic pigs whose brain is in their pants and who treat women disrespectful. Sorry, but I don’t think I match that profile.

Second Nature

It’s my feminine side. I’m doubting.

Is it really such a bad movie? No, I wouldn’t call it bad. Maybe the movie isn’t really funny (maybe I don’t have a sense of humor), but the interaction between Collette Wolfe and Sam Huntington felt natural and was amusing. It’s because of their enthusiasm that I kept watching. And some situations were ludicrous because of the recognisability. Like the toilet scene, for example. And in retrospect, the transformation of Dex Gamble (Riley Shanahan) was also quite funny in a certain way. Well, I’m sure if I keep thinking about it, I’m going to say it’s a fun movie. Is it possible that the small amount of female hormones in my body, cause this indecision? One advice, watch it yourself and decide on your own!

My rating 5/10
Links : IMDB

Reviews

Dark Encounter | A Low-budget Film With An Original Approach

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It’s incredibly hard to imagine
that four adults …
… and a dog!
… four adults and a dog
simply vanished in the course of an hour.

I saw “G-Loc” a while ago. And my first thought now was:  “Why not try another SF?“. Not only because it’s one of my favorite genres. But because “G-Loc” was horrible and a disappointment in every way. And I wanted to forget this ordeal as soon as possible by watching an SF of better quality. And luckily “Dark Encounter” was of a completely different quality than the latter. Even though that wasn’t really difficult to achieve. But in retrospect, I did wonder whether it was indeed an SF in the strict sense of the word.

 

 

Stroboscopic luminescent bulbs.

The opening scene shows mother and father Anderson coming home from a night out after which they discover that their daughter Maisie has mysteriously disappeared. However, there’s no trace or indication of a violent kidnapping. She simply vanished into thin air. In the next scene, we witness a family gathering. A family dinner where it’s abundantly clear that the pain of losing their child is still there, resulting in snappy conversations in a tense atmosphere. Until suddenly strange light phenomena are seen by Ray (Mel Raido) and he and the other present men suggest investigating the seeings. When they arrive in the forest and witness more spheres flying around and one of them disappears without a trace, they realize there’s more to it than some inexplicable weather phenomenon or local rascals playing with fireworks.

 

 

Mixed genres.

I have to admit that Carl Strathie knows how to mix different genres in an ingenious way. In general, you think that for the umpteenth time, alien green creatures are randomly abducting people to use them as guinea pigs for their experiments. Or maybe Martians who just dropped by to get acquainted. However, don’t expect impressive images of colossal intergalactic spacecraft. It’s limited to bright shining lights during a foggy night. Even though there are similarities with for example “Close Encounters of the Third Kind”, you won’t be awed by an immense spaceship with lighting like the dance floor in “Saturday Night Fever”. Next, you get the feeling that you are watching a scary horror where household objects defy the laws of gravity and where lights start to flicker. And as a basis, you have a family drama about missing a loved one and the accompanying grieving process.

 

 

What a surprising revelation.

And if these aren’t enough film genres, there’s the very surprising denouement, after which the whole is suddenly approached from a completely different perspective. The sci-fi aspect fades into the background and a crime mystery demands attention. The denouement is overwhelming and most will react in a similar way as I did. “Ah, that’s what’s going on” as I thought at that moment. All I wondered is the origin of the entities that provide the clarification. Aliens? Or spiritual manifestations? Not that this matters. The end result is what counts. And thanks to this highly original twist, this film effortlessly rises above average.

 

 

This flick is worth a watch.

Dark Encounter” is a low-budget film with an original approach. Despite the fact they diligently borrowed from other well-known films, “Dark Encounter” pleasantly surprised me. And not just because of the originality of the story. But also because of the acting by the almost unknown cast (especially Laura Fraser). Plus the excellent soundtrack and sound effects. And the nostalgic feeling it gave me. It reminded me several times of similar films from the 80s. And the overall mood they managed to create. There’s something else that surprised me after reading about it. It seems as if it all takes place in the U.S. during that period. And yet this movie was entirely filmed in the UK with English actors. Amazing. In short, this SF is highly recommended.

 

 

My rating 7/10
Links: IMDB

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The Silencing | Great Cinematography From A Low Budget Film

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I need to see that girl.
She could be my daughter.

 

It’s always nice to see how actors from a successful television series cope in a feature film. And especially if the genre is quite different from what they played in that series. Here Nikolaj Coster-Waldau makes a decent attempt to show that he has more to offer than playing a king’s son who prefers to perform gymnastic exercises with his sister between the sheets. His performance here is on a similar level to that of Jaime Lannister in “Game of Thrones”. Convincing enough, but not exactly of exceptional quality. A role that doesn’t annoy you. But every time you see his face somewhere, you have to think for a moment where you know that face from. This is also the case here in “The Silencing”. I was like, “Damn, where do I know this guy from?”. Only after fifteen minutes or so, I could figure it out.

 

 

Where there’s grief, there’s booze.

The Silencing” itself is of the same level. Certainly not a bad movie. But also not a movie that’ll blow you away. The story felt a bit incomplete to me. There were some improbabilities (not to say completely nonsensical decisions). And the denouement with the disclosure of the perpetrator and his motivation, I personally found a bit far-fetched. The film had something “Silence of the Lambs“-ish but then set in an extensive, forest-like nature reserve. An area managed by Rayborn Swanson (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) that has been given the name “Gwen Swanson sanctuary”. A reference to his daughter who has been missing for 5 years. It’s a place where animals can live undisturbed and protected, far from hunters and poachers. Rayborn lives an isolated life far from the civilized world. A way to silently grief about the loss of his daughter. Usually by consuming liters of alcohol. A bit strange because that’s exactly what caused that disappearance.

 

 

There’s a serial killer on the loose.

The story gets a little bit more exciting the moment a serial killer comes into the picture. Someone who probably watched “The Hunt” too much. What follows, is a cat-and-mouse game with the participation of the local female sheriff Alice Gustafson (Annabelle Wallis, series-loving fans will recognize her from “Peaky Blinders”) who herself has her hands full with the stupidities her little brother Brooks (Hero Fiennes Tiffin), a drug addict with a traumatic past.

 

 

Ridiculous things.

Without a doubt, this could have been a much better, coherent movie, provided the script was changed a bit. It’s linked together with hooks and eyes. Full of coincidences and ridiculous twists. Decisions are made that are too ridiculous for words. Alice’s surprising action at one point is understandable on the one hand. But on the other hand completely unreal. And the indifference that those involved show afterward as if nothing had ever happened, made me frown for a moment. Rayborn’s paint pot trick seemed so absurd and stupid that I spontaneously burst out laughing. Not exactly applicable to a serious thriller about a serial killer.

 

Mediocrity rules.

The Silencing” isn’t so great. A mediocre piece of movie. Actually, you could say that you’ve seen it all before in other movies. And much better movies too. Cinematographically it looks professional (despite the low budget) and the general mood is also good. But, when you love watching exciting flicks with nerve-racking suspense, you’ll be disappointed. The only thing I can’t say anything wrong about is Nikolaj Coster-Waldau’s acting. Solid and constant. Just like in “Game of Thrones“. Again a pitiful persona. But I’m sure I won’t recognize him in his next feature. Once again.

 

 

My rating 5/10
Links: IMDB

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Tenet – The Movie Mind Puzzle Of The Year

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There were times during ‘Tenet,’ that I wanted to perform a most heinous code violation by ripping off my face mask and declaring to all that “I bloody love Cinema”. Some of the action set-pieces in this film have to be seen on the big screen to do them justice. One particular sequence on an Estonian motorway is the sort of action that makes cinema such a magical and wondrous place.  I realized at this point I had missed cinema enormously over the past 6 months and it was wonderful to be back.

As for the film itself, I was quite nervous going in. I had read from one reviewer that it was “obnoxiously complex”, that a lot of the dialogue was mumbled or drowned by an omnipresent rumble of a score and that the film was incredibly difficult to follow. I won’t pretend that I understood everything that was going on, but it definitely wasn’t the mind dump that several claimed. I certainly followed it better than I do with the average David Lynch film. The sound is an interesting point, and I’ll come back to that shortly. It certainly is easy to write a “spoiler-free” review as I wouldn’t know how to spoil it for people.

The film charges along at a staggering pace, with the 2 and a half-hour run time zipping by. Performance-wise, John David Washington surely can have as good of a leading man career as his father,  while  Robert Pattinson continues to prove all his naysayers wrong with a charming yet enigmatic performance. Kenneth Branagh manages to keep the panto villainy just about under control, but the stand out for me was Elizabeth Debicki, who added a level of grace to the proceedings.

The action never lets up, and more importantly, it all has a purpose. It is not just thrown in there to demonstrate the techniques that Nolan possesses, it is all plot-driven. From the electric prologue at the Kyiv Opera to a Mission Impossible-style raid on an art warehouse at an airport, to the aforementioned Estonian motorway to the climactic showdown at a Soviet “closed city”, this is all part of the topsy-turvy narrative.

People have claimed that they struggled to hear all of the dialogue, which makes a confusing film even more of a challenge to comprehend. I do agree, there were some scenes where dialogue was often drowned out by the surrounding wall of noise. I don’t think this is anything new with Nolan films. I have a theory that Nolan makes films if you take Inception and Interstellar before Tenet, that is designed to have repeat viewings. His films are puzzles that can’t necessarily be understood on the first watch, some trails and thoughts perhaps are designed to make people come back to re-watch. You could argue, why to make a film that once watched can be dispensed with.

I didn’t find the occasionally intrusive score spoiled my enjoyment of the film, as the spectacle more than made up for it.

This is a hugely ambitious, occasionally baffling piece of cinema, packed with some of the most audacious action sequences (all shot with practical effects btw) I’ve seen in a long time. Yes, the plot is convoluted, yes there are sequences where you genuinely need a moment. About three-quarters of the way in, Pattinson asks Washington “Does your brain hurt yet?”, the audience answers for him with a knowing “a little”. It is a feast for the eyes, which is also quite humorous in places.

It’s films like this that make me appreciate the wonder of cinema, an original, standalone, non-franchise piece of searing entertainment. I’m glad I didn’t understand all of it, as it just encourages me to go watch it again.

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