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A prayer before dawn (2017)

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I don’t know
what you’re fucking saying,
I don’t understand.

What an impressive film. You won’t get a feeling of excitement or relaxation after watching it. It’ll rather leave a bad taste in your mouth. It was as if the smell of blood, rancid food, vomit, and sweat has nestled itself in my nostrils. I had this annoying, uncomfortable feeling afterward. I’m convinced there are other places in this world where you don’t want to end up and which aren’t good for your health, both physically and psychologically. But the Thai prison Klong Prem seems to me the most damned and inhumane place on our planet. A place where you stop being a person and where you try to survive in any way you can. I’m strongly in favor of setting up an exchange program for prisoners worldwide. In such a way that prisoners from wherever, get the chance to taste the prison climate of these regions. I’m sure many will start realizing how privileged their treatment is in this part of the world. Who knows, maybe even a few will come to their senses.

 

Is there a translator in the house?

A prayer before dawn” feels like a documentary. It’s as if the camera is filming over the shoulders of Billy Moore (Joe Cole) all the time, a Brit who’s a boxer in Thailand and is being arrested for selling drugs. The nightmare in which he’s imprisoned for three years and the daily struggle in this hell hole is the basis for his book that he publishes later on. It’s titled “A prayer before dawn: A nightmare in Thailand“. Don’t expect long dialogues. Or you are someone who understands Thai quite well. That alone would drive me crazy already. The endless whining and shouting of those tattooed, golden-toothed Thai criminals. You have no idea what they are talking about. You can only guess whether they ask a very ordinary question or threat you.

Brutal, intense and realistic.

The number of films that take place in prisons is almost infinite. But there are none so realistic and painful to behold as “A prayer before dawn“. Even “Brawl in Cell Block 99” doesn’t seem to be so brutal and intense, despite the extremely violent images. Why? Because “Brawl in Cell Block 99” is a fictional story. The story about Billy Moore shows an unambiguous, unvarnished picture of his struggle for survival and his perseverance to maintain himself in this barbaric environment. A story about how an individual has to push his limits both physically and psychically. A black and white portrait with a thin dividing line between life and death. One moment you see how Billy almost kills a fellow prisoner at the request of a corrupt guard. The next moment you see a tender moment between him and the transvestite Fame (Pornchanok Mabklang). A moment to catch your breath after all the brutal violence.

Top notch acting. Even from those ex-prisoners.

The acting of Joe Cole is extremely convincing. You can simply feel his fury, despair, and fear. Cole’s acting is purely en simply physical as there is practically no dialogue to be heard. A shrill and threatening “Fuck off” is the main thing that comes over his lips. You are witnessing how the accumulated tension and frustration suddenly flares up during confrontations and his Thai boxing. And at the same time, you see Cole fighting against his addiction. The Thai inmates are all amateurs in the field of acting but apparently, a large number of these side characters actually have spent time behind bars. Maybe that’s why it all feels so real.

Just go watch this top-notch movie.

No, “A prayer before dawn” is no fun to watch and will certainly still haunt you the next days after. If you expect a detailed story, you will certainly be disappointed afterward. The narrative is reasonably straightforward and concise. It’s nothing more than a report of Billy’s stay in this hellish place on earth and his constant fight to get out of it unscathed. But, as I said, this film will certainly stay with you. It’s, as it were, beaten into you.

My rating 7/10
Links: IMDB

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Tenet | Official Trailer #2 – HD

Tenet is an upcoming action thriller film written and directed by Christopher Nolan and produced by Nolan and Emma Thomas. It stars John David Washington, Robert Pattinson, Elizabeth Debicki, Dimple Kapadia, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Clémence Poésy, Michael Caine, and Kenneth Branagh.

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Genre:

Action, Drama, Thriller

Release Date:

July 17, 2020

Director:

Christopher Nolan

Cast:

John David Washington, Robert Pattinson, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Kenneth Branagh, Elizabeth Debicki, Michael Caine

Plot Summary:

Tenet is an upcoming action thriller film written and directed by Christopher Nolan and produced by Nolan and Emma Thomas. It stars John David Washington, Robert Pattinson, Elizabeth Debicki, Dimple Kapadia, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Clémence Poésy, Michael Caine, and Kenneth Branagh.

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Drama

Inhuman Resources (Derapages) – Netflix Review

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From the football pitch to the small screen, from kicking a supporter to headbutting antagonists, Eric Cantona forever leaves a lasting impression, whether you’re cheering for him or not. In Inhuman Resources (Derapages in France), Cantona leads the line as Alain Delambre across six episodes, a former HR manager betrayed by the system, who fights to regain significant employment.

Having been a HR manager, with a family, purchased apartment etc. etc., Alain had it all in both his career and home life. But having been relegated to low-paid poor quality jobs for six years now, the apartment falling apart, and an almost hollow marriage, Alain is in the scrapheap. From riches to rags, a result of age discrimination. Regarded as a senior, Alain claims that employment bosses treat you as the, “Last to get hired, first to get laid-off,”. Wife Nicole (Suzanne Clement) brings forward a job opportunity, a HR role, but a depressed and broken-down Alain, despite being desperate beyond belief, has lost all faith and belief in his abilities. Having been forced to leave another inadequate job, Alain finds himself with no choice but to apply for this role.

Alain’s shot at redemption, however, entails much more than a sophisticated one-to-one interview or presentation, it instead requires a form of role-play…in the guise of pretend hostage taking. Essentially, Alain has to instruct and lead a unit, with the mission of pushing high-level employees to the limit, with the endgame being a display of who possesses the most loyalty amidst a nearby mass employee lay-off. What could possibly go wrong?

For the first few episodes of Inhuman Resources, the concept of the job and application process really drives the narrative and the tone. In fact, the research taken for the role establishes an overwhelming black comedic tone throughout, which timely coincides with viewers still getting used to Cantona as an actor. Of course, when the story and situations within the show transcend into a more serious nature, the tone and genre progresses too. The second half of the series is, essentially, a crime-thriller. When there is an attempt at being serious, it more or less hits the mark. Inhuman Resources is utterly brilliant.



As one would naturally expect, Cantona is the standout performer from the show. A clear progression from the self-service within Looking for Eric (2009) where he plays himself, Cantona’s acting chops are magnifique. A truly extraordinary performance of an extraordinary character. However, as interesting and brilliant the character of Alain may be, he is, unfortunately the only character of significance who doesn’t lack cliche, unlike the corporate suits led by Alex Lutz’ Alexandre Dofmann, with a hairstyle similar to that of Andre Rieu.

In the current climate where employment and job security are at an anxiety level higher than ever, Inhuman Resources feels like its relevance has been elevated significantly. Amid its dual nature of black comedy and crime, there is a serious social commentary at the heart of the series that goes beyond Parisian culture, therefore resulting in the establishment of a thought-provoking viewing at international level. The Ziad Doueiri directed – based-on-a-true-story – series is now available in full on Netflix.

Rating: 4/5

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Drama

Da 5 Bloods | Official Trailer – HD

From Academy Award® Winner Spike Lee comes a New Joint: the story of four African-American Vets — Paul (Delroy Lindo), Otis (Clarke Peters), Eddie (Norm Lewis), and Melvin (Isiah Whitlock, Jr.) — who return to Vietnam. Searching for the remains of their fallen Squad Leader (Chadwick Boseman) and the promise of buried treasure, our heroes, joined by Paul’s concerned son (Jonathan Majors), battle forces of Man and Nature — while confronted by the lasting ravages of The Immorality of The Vietnam War.

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Genre:

Drama, War

Release Date:

June 12, 2020

Director:

Spike Lee

Cast:

Chadwick Boseman, Jean Reno, Paul Walter Hauser, Delroy Lindo, Jasper Pääkkönen, Clarke Peters, Van Veronica Ngo

Plot Summary:

rom Academy Award® Winner Spike Lee comes a new joint: the story of four African American Vets – Paul (Delroy Lindo), Otis (Clarke Peters), Eddie (Norm Lewis), and Melvin (Isiah Whitlock, Jr.) – who return to Vietnam. Searching for the remains of their fallen Squad Leader (Chadwick Boseman) and the promise of buried treasure, our heroes, joined by Paul’s concerned son (Jonathan Majors), battle forces of Man and Nature – while confronted by the lasting ravages of The Immorality of The Vietnam War.

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