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Fractured (2018)

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Who the fuck are you?
Guess Who.

Are you a fan of home-invasion movies where the concept of revenge keeps coming back, then this might be a must see for you. I say “maybe” because you’ll have to wait patiently for the first forty minutes before you realize what it’s all about. The film “Fractured” is unquestionably masterful when the surprising twist kicks in. Trust me on this, it ensures a completely different view on the story. Something that suddenly gives the two main characters Michael and Rebecca (Karl Davies and April Pearson) a completely different personality. A unique momentum in an otherwise very clichéd story. One that stimulates your curiosity so that you’ll sit up straight again.

 

 

It starts pleasantly.

It all starts quite pleasantly with a young couple driving an old Volkswagen beetle on English country roads in the middle of the night. On their way to a cottage in the country so they can enjoy a relaxing weekend far away from the stress. I suppose. A flat tire makes sure tension increases with Rebecca, in particular, reacting rather ill-tempered. Tiredness apparently gets to her. And when they stop a bit later at a gas station, the atmosphere becomes grim. Partly thanks to the strange behavior of the attendant. And so the pleasant atmosphere is gone. At that time, I thought these young people would be abducted by a psychopathic, cannibalistic family living in this no man’s land and waiting for innocent tourists. Something similar as in “The Texas chainsaw massacre”.

 

 

Look out! Here’s the twist.

Once arrived at the country house, everything seems to be going smooth again. The luggage is being unpacked. Rebecca takes a bath as relaxation. And Michael prepares a nice dinner complete with candles and wine. A romantic moment to recover from the long trip. But Rebecca has a feeling someone’s lurking around and that they are constantly being observed. Her shoes are suddenly gone without a trace and shadows move through the house. And at that moment I thought it was something supernatural that was happening here. Until the film makes a leap back in time and the sneaky twist presents itself. And as the second half of the film progresses, everything becomes a bit clear and you gradually begin to realize what’s really going on. Elaborating more is an unacceptable fact. I certainly don’t want to deprive those who haven’t seen the film of the pleasure of watching it.

 

 

Not original, but recommendable.

So this low-budget English thriller is full of plus points. Even though the budget is limited, I thought that the camera work looked solid. And the location where it all plays out was limited but adequate. Perhaps the fact that it was mostly dark, was a bit exaggerated. I still wonder why people go exploring in a house in the middle of the night, without even turning on the lights. The acting was also of a decent level. I thought the acting of Karl Davies and April Pearson was extremely credible. The chemistry between the two was realistic. I especially liked April Pearson (and not just because she looks damn good). The way in which she plays her personality bears witness to certain professionalism. And then also some (minor) negative points. The story itself isn’t really original (except the twist of course). It feels repetitive at a certain point, which is self-evident because of the required flashback. And the end is somewhat disappointing. But the movie is still recommendable. Thanks to the short playing time, this is something you can enjoy in between.

 

My rating 6/10
Links: IMDB

HORROR

LFF 2020 Review: Possessor

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London Film Festival is almost over and there’s been a lot of good stuff over the last couple of weeks. The 64th BFI London Film Festival has been all across the UK, inviting you to experience the world’s best new films wherever you are. Twelve days of UK premieres available to enjoy online via BFI Player or in cinemas at BFI Southbank, around London, and throughout the UK.

Possessor (also known as Possessor: Uncut) is the latest film from Brandon Cronenberg, son of David Cronenberg, who’s known by horror enthusiasts as the king of body horror. Brandon has clearly learnt from the best as could be seen from his 2012 debut film Antiviral starring Caleb Landry Jones. Brandon’s second feature film, Possessor premiered at Sundance Film Festival in January and was released in America and Canada on October 2nd. I managed to catch an early preview of it at London Film Festival before it’s UK release at the end of November.

The film follows Andrea Riseborough’s Tasya Vos, an agent who inhabits other people’s bodies through a new technology and in doing so she commits assassinations to benefit her company. But slowly she starts to lose control over the system and finds herself trapped in the mind of Christopher Abbott’s Colin when trying to kill his father (Sean Bean).

Right from the start Possessor is a very gruesome and gory film. It opens with a very brutal and bloody killing that throws us straight into the futuristic world of the film. If the name Cronenberg on the poster didn’t already tell you, within minutes, we know that this film is not going to be one for the faint-hearted. The premise of the film is a little over the top, with the whole idea of inhabiting other people’s bodies and being able to control them. But it’s one that Cronenberg handles with ease and skill. As well as gore.

The film is disturbing but it’s carried out in a stylish manner so that it never really feels too disturbing. If you’re not a horror fan, or if you’re not someone that can handle much gore, then this isn’t a film for you. But if you relish the films of David Cronenberg then you should definitely seek out Brandon’s film.

Whilst the film does have its ultra-violent moments, there’s more to it than that; Andrea Riseborough gives a good performance in the lead role and helps bring life to the main character and the world the film takes place in as well as the bodies Tasya takes over. There are a lot of interesting ideas to unpack in this film and whilst Cronenberg doesn’t really get a chance to deal with them all in sufficient detail, he takes a good stab at it.

Overall, Brandon Cronenberg has created a film that’s a clear step up from his debut film and a welcome addition to the body horror genre that leaves you shocked but also excited to see what he goes on to make next.

3.5/5

Possessor is released in U.K. cinemas on November 27.

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HORROR

LFF 2020 Review: Rose: A Love Story

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London Film Festival is well underway and there’s a lot of good stuff available now and coming your way over the next few days. The 64th BFI London Film Festival is all across the UK, inviting you to experience the world’s best new films wherever you are. Twelve days of UK premieres are available to enjoy online via BFI Player or in cinemas at BFI Southbank, around London, and throughout the UK.

Before I get into it, I do want to highlight that it’s quite hard to talk about this film without giving it away or spoiling anything. This review will be completely spoiler-free so you don’t have to worry about spoilers however the review might be a little brief or vague as I don’t want to divulge any key points or anything that could ruin the viewing experience for you.

 

Rose: A Love Story is the directorial debut from Jennifer Sheridan and once film starts it instantly hooks you with a very interesting premise. Rose (Sophie Rundle) and her husband Sam (Matt Stokoe) live in a secluded woodland where Rose spends her time writing and Sam tends to vegetables and attempts to trap rabbits. But there’s a deeper mystery to their lives. We don’t really get any backstory for either of our two main characters and yet it doesn’t matter. Right from the start, you have questions you want answered and it keeps you hooked. We don’t know much about what’s going on but nonetheless we are intrigued to find out more.

However, whilst the film opens well and you want to know where it’s going, it doesn’t do a whole lot more than that. It’s a horror film although there isn’t a whole lot of horror in it which is a little disappointing. I was expecting a few more scares from the film than were delivered. I might even go so far as to say it’s also a drama film and it isn’t completely a horror. And it does walk some well-known horror tropes to the point that you can see where it’s going before it gets there if you‘re a horror film enthusiast.

As a result of all this, as well as some pacing issues in the second act, it does start to get a bit dull. The ending is good but not great because I found myself being able to predict where it was going and what was going to happen.

Even though the film was made pre-COVID-19, there are some interesting ideas regarding isolation and cabin fever in this film- and there are even face masks too!

Overall, Rose: A Love Story starts off with a really strong set-up but ends up doing very little with it making the rest of the film somewhat uninteresting and creating a rather predictable conclusion.

2.5/5

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LFF 2020 Review: Another Round (Druk)

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London Film Festival is well underway and there’s a lot of good stuff available now and coming your way over the next week. The 64th BFI London Film Festival is all across the UK, inviting you to experience the world’s best new films wherever you are. Twelve days of UK premieres are available to enjoy online via BFI Player or in cinemas at BFI Southbank, around London, and throughout the UK.

Another Round (Druk in Danish) is the latest film from Thomas Vinterberg (The Hunt (2012), The Celebration (1998)) starring Mads Mikkelsen (Hannibal, Doctor Strange). The film follows four school teachers who want to test out a hypothesis that one of them has read that can potentially improve their lives- that they should maintain a constant level of alcohol in their blood.

“The world is never as we expect”

The four teachers decide that they will make sure there is alcohol in their bodies at all times except for after 8pm and on weekends. It’s certainly a very interesting premise and it’s both amusing and interesting to see them go about this. It is a very strange film and it’s one that could have very easily ended up being a silly film that wasn’t very good at all but Thomas Vinterberg has created this film with a lot of care and has produced a really great film.

It sounds like it’s quite a heavy film with some important themes and whilst this is the case, and it does touch on some weighty issues, it’s also a very light and watchable film. It has a lot of rather funny moments as well as the more important and more significant moments relating to alcohol intake. And so, the film manages to balance that tone just right between light-hearted fun and deeper, important issues.

The whole cast are very good in this film but much like the previous Vinterberg/Mikkelsen collaboration The Hunt, Mads Mikkelsen is outstanding and gives a phenomenal performance. Another Round and The Hunt are both films that are worth watching solely for Mikkelsen’s amazing performances despite them both being films that are great in many other ways. Mikkelsen truly is a triumph in this film and I implore you to watch it when you can. As is the case with any foreign language film, you forget about the subtitles very early on and subtitles should never put you off a film- you miss out on so many great films if you only watch English language films.

The film has ups and downs, it highlights some really important issues regarding substance abuse as well as morality and age and it ends with one of the best scenes of the year. Another Round really is worth seeking out as it handles all these important issues so well and it’s a film that’s also just a really good time.

Overall, Vinterberg has crafted another outstanding film, and whilst it certainly isn’t his best film, it’s still a great feel-good film and it’s my favourite film of London Film Festival so far and one of my favourite films of 2020.

4/5

Another Round is released in U.K. cinemas on November 20th.

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